Blockchain series tutorial 1: bitcoin wallet and ...

Bitcoin/LN Cryptography Tutorial Toolkit

submitted by 5tu to BitcoinTechnology [link] [comments]

RiB Newsletter #15 – Turbofish in the Blocksea

Rust blockchain development continued at its typical blistering pace, and again it's impossible to follow everything going on.
This month we see continued advancement in zero-knowledge computing, an obvious focus from the entire blockchain industry on the DeFi phenomenon, and some new hackathons with opportunities for Rust developers.
Every month seems to bring advancements in zero-knowledge proofs, and new implementations in Rust. It is a research area that will probably impact the general computing industry eventually, and one where the blockchain industry is leading the way, and one where Rust has a huge foothold. Even projects that are not written in Rust we see implementing their zero-knowledge cryptography in Rust. But this stuff is extremely technical, and improving at a rapid pace. We fear we will never understand it.
There are several Rust blockchains now in development that are built around zero-knowledge VMs, whose smart contracts create zero-knowledge proofs:
These are networks that support nearly arbitrary computation over secret inputs. Like programable Zcash.
Speaking of Zcash, the zkSNARK pioneers announced their next-generation zero-knowledge proof system, called Halo 2, which uses a new zkSNARK construction, PLONK.
Two projects built on Rust blockchains launched this month: Serum, a decentralized exchange built on Solana; and Flux, a prediction market built on NEAR. Next month Secret Network launches their mainnet.
Finally, Mozilla laid off all but one of its full-time Rust employees. There are a few other people left at Mozilla who actively contribute to Rust as part of their role in Firefox, but this mostly ends Mozilla's commitment to Rust's development.
There's no need to worry though. Rust was designed to outlive Mozilla's withdrawal, and the project will continue nearly unaffected.

Project Spotlight

Each month we like to shine a light on a notable Rust blockchain project. This month that project is…
Fluence.
This is a blockchain with built-in software license management. We’re excited about this because license management is a rare non-currency use case for blockchains that makes a lot of sense. While we might expect to see more blockchain platforms devoted solely to digital licensing, fluence is actually a complete distributed computing platform, with a unique vision about using license management to generate profit from open source software.

Interesting Things

News

Blog Posts

Papers

Projects

Podcasts and Videos


Read more: https://rustinblockchain.org/newsletters/2020-09-02-turbofish-in-the-blocksea/
submitted by Aimeedeer to rust [link] [comments]

RiB Newsletter #14 – Are We Smart (Contract) Yet?

We’re seeing a bunch of interesting Rust blockchain and crypto projects, so this month the “Interesting Things” section is loaded up with news, papers, and project links.
This month, Elrond, appeared on our radar with the launch of their mainnet. Although not written in Rust, it runs Rust smart contracts on its Arwen WASM VM, which itself is based on the Rust Wasmer VM. Along with NEAR, Nervos, and Enigma (and probably others), this continues an encouraging trend of blockchains enabling smart contracts in Rust. See the “Interesting Things” section for examples of Elrond’s Rust contracts.
Rust continues to be popular for research into zero-knowledge proofs, with Microsoft releasing Spartan, a zk-SNARK system without trusted setup.
In RiB news, we published a late one-year anniversary blog post. It has some reflection on the changes to, and growth of, RiB over the last year.
The Awesome Blockchain Rust project, which is maintained by Sun under the rust-in-blockchain GitHub org, has received a stream of updates recently, and is now published as the Awesome-RiB page on rustinblockchain.org.
It’s a pretty good resource for finding blockchain-related Rust projects, with links to many of the more prominent and mature projects noted in the RiB newsletter. It could use more eyes on it though.

Project Spotlight

Each month we like to shine a light on a notable Rust blockchain project. This month that project is…
ethers.rs
ethers.rs is an Ethereum & Celo library and wallet implementation, implemented as a port of the ethers.js library to Rust.
Ethereum client programming is usually done in JavaScript with either web3.js or ethers.js, with ethers.js being the newer of the two. These clients communicate to an Ethereum node, typically via JSON-RPC (or, when in the browser, via an “injected” client provider that follows EIP-1193, like MetaMask).
ethers.rs then provides a strongly-typed alternative for writing software that interacts with the Ethereum network.
As of now it is only suited for non-browser use cases, but if you prefer hacking in Rust to JavaScript, as some of us surely do, it is worth looking into for your next Ethereum project.
The author of ethers.rs, Georgios Konstantopoulos, accepts donations to sponsor their work.
Note that there is also a Rust alternative to web3.js, rust-web3.

Interesting Things

News

Blog Posts

Papers

Projects

Podcasts and Videos


Read more: https://rustinblockchain.org/newsletters/2020-08-05-are-we-smart-contract-yet/
submitted by Aimeedeer to rust [link] [comments]

ECDSA In Bitcoin

Digital signatures are considered the foundation of online sovereignty. The advent of public-key cryptography in 1976 paved the way for the creation of a global communications tool – the Internet, and a completely new form of money – Bitcoin. Although the fundamental properties of public-key cryptography have not changed much since then, dozens of different open-source digital signature schemes are now available to cryptographers.

How ECDSA was incorporated into Bitcoin

When Satoshi Nakamoto, a mystical founder of the first crypto, started working on Bitcoin, one of the key points was to select the signature schemes for an open and public financial system. The requirements were clear. An algorithm should have been widely used, understandable, safe enough, easy, and, what is more important, open-sourced.
Of all the options available at that time, he chose the one that met these criteria: Elliptic Curve Digital Signature Algorithm, or ECDSA.
At that time, native support for ECDSA was provided in OpenSSL, an open set of encryption tools developed by experienced cipher banks in order to increase the confidentiality of online communications. Compared to other popular schemes, ECDSA had such advantages as:
These are extremely useful features for digital money. At the same time, it provides a proportional level of security: for example, a 256-bit ECDSA key has the same level of security as a 3072-bit RSA key (Rivest, Shamir и Adleman) with a significantly smaller key size.

Basic principles of ECDSA

ECDSA is a process that uses elliptic curves and finite fields to “sign” data in such a way that third parties can easily verify the authenticity of the signature, but the signer himself reserves the exclusive opportunity to create signatures. In the case of Bitcoin, the “data” that is signed is a transaction that transfers ownership of bitcoins.
ECDSA has two separate procedures for signing and verifying. Each procedure is an algorithm consisting of several arithmetic operations. The signature algorithm uses the private key, and the verification algorithm uses only the public key.
To use ECDSA, such protocol as Bitcoin must fix a set of parameters for the elliptic curve and its finite field, so that all users of the protocol know and apply these parameters. Otherwise, everyone will solve their own equations, which will not converge with each other, and they will never agree on anything.
For all these parameters, Bitcoin uses very, very large (well, awesomely incredibly huge) numbers. It is important. In fact, all practical applications of ECDSA use huge numbers. After all, the security of this algorithm relies on the fact that these values are too large to pick up a key with a simple brute force. The 384-bit ECDSA key is considered safe enough for the NSA's most secretive government service (USA).

Replacement of ECDSA

Thanks to the hard work done by Peter Wuille (a famous cryptography specialist) and his colleagues on an improved elliptical curve called secp256k1, Bitcoin's ECDSA has become even faster and more efficient. However, ECDSA still has some shortcomings, which can serve as a sufficient basis for its complete replacement. After several years of research and experimentation, a new signature scheme was established to increase the confidentiality and efficiency of Bitcoin transactions: Schnorr's digital signature scheme.
Schnorr's signature takes the process of using “keys” to a new level. It takes only 64 bytes when it gets into the block, which reduces the space occupied by transactions by 4%. Since transactions with the Schnorr signature are the same size, this makes it possible to pre-calculate the total size of the part of the block that contains such signatures. A preliminary calculation of the block size is the key to its safe increase in the future.
Keep up with the news of the crypto world at CoinJoy.io Follow us on Twitter and Medium. Subscribe to our YouTube channel. Join our Telegram channel. For any inquiries mail us at [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]).
submitted by CoinjoyAssistant to btc [link] [comments]

ECDSA In Bitcoin

Digital signatures are considered the foundation of online sovereignty. The advent of public-key cryptography in 1976 paved the way for the creation of a global communications tool – the Internet, and a completely new form of money – Bitcoin. Although the fundamental properties of public-key cryptography have not changed much since then, dozens of different open-source digital signature schemes are now available to cryptographers.

How ECDSA was incorporated into Bitcoin

When Satoshi Nakamoto, a mystical founder of the first crypto, started working on Bitcoin, one of the key points was to select the signature schemes for an open and public financial system. The requirements were clear. An algorithm should have been widely used, understandable, safe enough, easy, and, what is more important, open-sourced.
Of all the options available at that time, he chose the one that met these criteria: Elliptic Curve Digital Signature Algorithm, or ECDSA.
At that time, native support for ECDSA was provided in OpenSSL, an open set of encryption tools developed by experienced cipher banks in order to increase the confidentiality of online communications. Compared to other popular schemes, ECDSA had such advantages as:
These are extremely useful features for digital money. At the same time, it provides a proportional level of security: for example, a 256-bit ECDSA key has the same level of security as a 3072-bit RSA key (Rivest, Shamir и Adleman) with a significantly smaller key size.

Basic principles of ECDSA

ECDSA is a process that uses elliptic curves and finite fields to “sign” data in such a way that third parties can easily verify the authenticity of the signature, but the signer himself reserves the exclusive opportunity to create signatures. In the case of Bitcoin, the “data” that is signed is a transaction that transfers ownership of bitcoins.
ECDSA has two separate procedures for signing and verifying. Each procedure is an algorithm consisting of several arithmetic operations. The signature algorithm uses the private key, and the verification algorithm uses only the public key.
To use ECDSA, such protocol as Bitcoin must fix a set of parameters for the elliptic curve and its finite field, so that all users of the protocol know and apply these parameters. Otherwise, everyone will solve their own equations, which will not converge with each other, and they will never agree on anything.
For all these parameters, Bitcoin uses very, very large (well, awesomely incredibly huge) numbers. It is important. In fact, all practical applications of ECDSA use huge numbers. After all, the security of this algorithm relies on the fact that these values are too large to pick up a key with a simple brute force. The 384-bit ECDSA key is considered safe enough for the NSA's most secretive government service (USA).

Replacement of ECDSA

Thanks to the hard work done by Peter Wuille (a famous cryptography specialist) and his colleagues on an improved elliptical curve called secp256k1, Bitcoin's ECDSA has become even faster and more efficient. However, ECDSA still has some shortcomings, which can serve as a sufficient basis for its complete replacement. After several years of research and experimentation, a new signature scheme was established to increase the confidentiality and efficiency of Bitcoin transactions: Schnorr's digital signature scheme.
Schnorr's signature takes the process of using “keys” to a new level. It takes only 64 bytes when it gets into the block, which reduces the space occupied by transactions by 4%. Since transactions with the Schnorr signature are the same size, this makes it possible to pre-calculate the total size of the part of the block that contains such signatures. A preliminary calculation of the block size is the key to its safe increase in the future.
Keep up with the news of the crypto world at CoinJoy.io Follow us on Twitter and Medium. Subscribe to our YouTube channel. Join our Telegram channel. For any inquiries mail us at [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]).
submitted by CoinjoyAssistant to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Algorand announces $50M grant program to boost its blockchain

The Algorand Foundation has announced a new grants program worth $50 million.
A decentralized finance-focused blockchain platform, Algorand has earmarked a total of 250 million ALGO tokens for the multi-year initiative, designed “to provide funding to projects building apps to support infrastructure, end-user application, and research innovation on its blockchain.”
In addition, on April 14 the Algorand Foundation also announced a new developers portal, featuring tutorials, articles, and use-case solutions featuring code samples and explanations.
Three beneficiaries of the fund have already been announced, who will share six million ALGO (about $1.2 million) between them.
Multi-blockchain infrastructure provider Bloq delivers Algorand nodes and APIs, while PureStake is an open-source browser plug-in allowing developers to add the capacity for Algorand transactions into their applications. Lastly, the development platform Reach is “designed to remove the complexity of building DApps on the Algorand blockchain and to enable the future creation of DAOs, decentralized exchanges and many other DeFi applications on Algorand.”

The criteria

Projects that are selected to receive a grant are chosen based on the positive impact they could have on the Algorand community and on the ecosystem. Other factors include the quality of the application, the technical or academic strength of the proposal, and the concept’s opportunity for growth going forward.
Bloq, PureStake, and Reach are going to undergo an evaluation after receiving the funding. The Algorand Foundation says it plans to introduce an open grant program in the not-too-distant future—enabling the broader community to vote on which projects should receive grants.
“The grant program from the Algorand Foundation is one of the most focused programs out there, and we believe it will be instrumental in accelerating the adoption of Algorand’s platform,” Reach founder Chris Swenor said.
PureStake CEO Derek Yoo added that “easy and pragmatic developer tools are critical to further expanding the accessibility of the Algorand network.”

Cool tool

The Algorand blockchain is the brainchild of Silvio Micali, a Turing-award winning cryptographer and MIT professor who is also one of the minds behind zero-knowledge proofs, a cryptography method gaining a following in privacy-focused cryptocurrency circles. He is No. 81 on the Modern Consensus 100 most influential people in crypto 2020 list.
As reported by Modern Consensus, Algorand recently won plaudits for its energy-efficient blockchain protocol.
In January, French start-up PlanetWatch chose the firm as a partner to put global air quality test results on the blockchain.
Algorand was chosen because of how its platform requires “minimal processing power” to achieve consensus—a serious issue considering that some studies indicate that Bitcoin mining uses as much energy as Switzerland.
submitted by Superb_Recognition to algorand [link] [comments]

Join in Completing the Infrastructure for the Whole Digital Era, PlatON Is Recruiting!

Join in Completing the Infrastructure for the Whole Digital Era, PlatON Is Recruiting!
How can a great project succeed without a strong community?
Holding the belief of enabling a better and more secure world, PlatON strives to be a top player in the fields of privacy-preserving computation, and serve as the infrastructure for privacy-preserving computation and distributed economies. PlatON keeps enhancing the research and development on blockchain and cryptography technologies to deliver comprehensive solutions on data privacy, improving the features, performance, stability and upgrade of PlatON network, and has deeply get involved in the midst of “5G + IoT + big data + smart city + AI” ecosystem of the interconnected world we are and will be living in. With years of development and achievements, PlatON now stands ahead in the privacy-preserving computation field with our solid theoretical work, technologies and engineering implementation.
Now, we’ve completed the development of PlatON new Baleyworld with WASM contract supported, and in the intensive development of our main net. the development and maintenance of community and users, and will spare no effort in building an open, transparent and robust community with huge resources. We want to complete the PlatON ecosystem and the infrastructure for the whole digital world with all talents worldwide.
Join in PlatON community means you are not only a member, but also a part of PlatON ecosystem.

https://preview.redd.it/azi639gy1es41.jpg?width=5761&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=96c31faad76da4fd85b63900422ed727b69cd389
Benefits of being a part of PlatON:
  1. Get closer to the solid PlatON team and the world’s leading cryptography algorithms and technologies;
  2. Be updated about the latest development and move of PlatON, get good, valuable and authentic information of PlatON and even the whole blockchain industry.
  3. Get rare chance to compete with global big names by working with PlatON;
  4. Win huge profit of investment at the early stage of a promising and great project;
  5. Witness the development of a great project, grow with the infrastructure for the whole digital world
  6. PlatON offers all community members things that are better than others charge for. Community-building in PlatON is not only about engagement, but also building trust. How deeply you can go in PlatON community totally depends on how deep you want to work with PlatON and create value for PlatON community and the whole ecosystem.
PlatON looks forward to working with all great minds worldwide, whether if you are an individual investor, blockchain enthusiast, scholar, developer, you are sincerely welcomed to join us for an open, transparent and robust high-quality PlatON community ecosystem. Currently, PlatON communities are all opened to all friends worldwide, with sufficient rewards. Join now!

✨ Twitter

u/PlatON_Network
  1. Follow u/PlatON_Network: 10LAT
  2. Like and retweet PlatON pinned message with #cryptography, #dataprivacy, #datasecurity, u/PlatON_Network: 10LAT
  3. Invited 3 friends to follow PlatON official Twitter:30LAT
After that, Comment your Twitter username, retweeted link and your friends’ username to the tweet: https://twitter.com/PlatON_Network/status/1248841436906360832?s=20

✨ Telegram

PlatON Network Official:https://t.me/PlatONNetwork
PlatON Network China: https://t.me/PlatONNetworkCN
  1. Join PlatON Telegram group: 10LAT
  2. Invite 3 friends to join PlatON Telegram group: 30LAT
  3. Be a community contributor. Help other community members by answering their questions correctly to win the upvote from admins: 10LAT/upvote
Note: please respect and follow the rules of PlatON telegram group, otherwise, you may be banned by admin.
After that, Comment your Telegram username and your friends’ username to the tweet:
https://twitter.com/PlatON_Network/status/1248844886423543808?s=20

✨ Facebook

https://www.facebook.com/PlatONNetwork

  1. Follow PlatON Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/PlatONNetwork: 10LAT
  2. Like PlatON Facebook page & like and share PlatON’s Ethereum PoC post: 15 LAT
  3. Invite 3 friends to follow PlatON Facebook: 30LAT
After that, Comment your Facebook username, shared post link and your friends’ username to the tweet:
https://twitter.com/PlatON_Network/status/1248843849738436608?s=20.

✨ LinkedIn

https://www.linkedin.com/company/platonnetwork/
  1. Follow PlatON LinkedIn page https://www.linkedin.com/company/platonnetwork/: 10LAT
  2. Like and retweet PlatON’s Ethereum PoC post: 10 LAT
After that, Comment your LinkedIn username and shared post link to the tweet:
https://twitter.com/PlatON_Network/status/1248848308526858240?s=20

✨ Reddit

https://www.reddit.com/PlatONNetwork/
  1. Subscribe PlatON subreddit https://www.reddit.com/PlatONNetwork/: 10LAT
  2. PlatON Subreddit building:
Create a post about PlatON on PlatON subreddit, including review, introduction, news. No word limit, you will win reward based on the quality of your article:
  1. Cool: 10LAT
2. Great: 30LAT
  1. Extraordinary: 100LAT
  2. Promote PlatON
Create a post about PlatON on other hot subreddit such as bitcoin, blockchain, cryptocurrency, crypto, etc.: 10LAT
After that, Comment your Reddit username and your post link to the tweet:
https://twitter.com/PlatON_Network/status/1248860249005658112?s=20

✨ Medium

https://medium.com/@PlatON_Network
  1. Follow PlatON Medium https://medium.com/@PlatON_Network:10LAT
Write an article about Medium and publish it on your Mediem, including project/code, introduction, tutorial, etc. You will win reward based on the quality of our article:
Cool: 100LAT
lRequirements
1) Must be relevant to PlatON
2) 300+ words
3) Includes a picture about PlatON
4) Includes a link about PlatON with the anchor text of PlatON
5) Includes one of : cryptography, privacy-preserving computation, data privacy and data security in the article
Standard:
1) General introduction without big grammatical mistakes and description mistakes
2) Should be smooth statement
Great:200LAT
Requirements:
1) Must be relevant to PlatON
2) 5oo+words;
3) Includes a picture about PlatON
4) Includes 2 links about PlatON with the anchor text of PlatON and privacy-preserving computation
5) Includes at least two of: cryptography, data privacy, data security in the article
Standard:
Should include a complete introduction about PlatON, including solutions, technologies, collaboration programs, etc.
Extraordinary:300LAT
Requirements:
1) Must be relevant to PlatON
2) 800+ words
3) Includes at least 2 pictures about PlatON
4) Includes 2 links about PlatON with the anchor text of PlatON and privacy-preserving computation
5) Includes at least two of: cryptography, data privacy, data security in the article
Standard:
1)Should include a complete introduction about PlatON, including solutions, technologies, collaboration programs, etc.
2) Should be a professional project/code review
After that, Comment your Medium username and article link to the tweet:
https://twitter.com/PlatON_Network/status/1248861427273797632?s=20
The community campaign will be valid till Apr. 30, 2020, Never miss out!
submitted by PlatON_Network to u/PlatON_Network [link] [comments]

Start learning programming " Here is the best Platforms for you"

Step by step Help for you:
Platforms Node.js Frontend Development iOS Android IoT & Hybrid Apps Electron Cordova React Native Xamarin Linux ContainersOS X Command-Line ScreensaverswatchOS JVM Salesforce Amazon Web Services Windows IPFS Fuse HerokuProgramming Languages JavaScript Promises Standard Style Must Watch Talks Tips Network Layer Micro npm Packages Mad Science npm Packages Maintenance Modules - For npm packages npmAVA - Test runner ESLintSwift Education PlaygroundsPython Rust Haskell PureScript Go Scala Ruby EventsClojure ClojureScript Elixir Elm Erlang Julia Lua C C/C++ R D Common Lisp Perl Groovy Dart JavaRxJava Kotlin OCaml Coldfusion Fortran .NET PHP Delphi Assembler AutoHotkey AutoIt Crystal TypeScriptFront-end Development ES6 Tools Web Performance Optimization Web Tools CSS Critical-Path Tools Scalability Must-Watch Talks ProtipsReact RelayWeb Components Polymer Angular 2 Angular Backbone HTML5 SVG Canvas KnockoutJS Dojo Toolkit Inspiration Ember Android UI iOS UI Meteor BEM Flexbox Web Typography Web Accessibility Material Design D3 Emails jQuery TipsWeb Audio Offline-First Static Website Services A-Frame VR - Virtual reality Cycle.js Text Editing Motion UI Design Vue.js Marionette.js Aurelia Charting Ionic Framework 2 Chrome DevToolsBack-end Development Django Flask Docker Vagrant Pyramid Play1 Framework CakePHP Symfony EducationLaravel EducationRails GemsPhalcon Useful .htaccess Snippets nginx Dropwizard Kubernetes LumenComputer Science University Courses Data Science Machine Learning TutorialsSpeech and Natural Language Processing SpanishLinguistics Cryptography Computer Vision Deep Learning - Neural networks TensorFlowDeep Vision Open Source Society University Functional Programming Static Analysis & Code Quality Software-Defined NetworkingBig Data Big Data Public Datasets Hadoop Data Engineering StreamingTheory Papers We Love Talks Algorithms Algorithm Visualizations Artificial Intelligence Search Engine Optimization Competitive Programming MathBooks Free Programming Books Free Software Testing Books Go Books R Books Mind Expanding Books Book AuthoringEditors Sublime Text Vim Emacs Atom Visual Studio CodeGaming Game Development Game Talks Godot - Game engine Open Source Games Unity - Game engine Chess LÖVE - Game engine PICO-8 - Fantasy consoleDevelopment Environment Quick Look Plugins - OS X Dev Env Dotfiles Shell Command-Line Apps ZSH Plugins GitHub Browser Extensions Cheat SheetGit Cheat Sheet & Git Flow Git Tips Git Add-ons SSH FOSS for DevelopersEntertainment Podcasts Email NewslettersDatabases Database MySQL SQLAlchemy InfluxDB Neo4j Doctrine - PHP ORM MongoDBMedia Creative Commons Media Fonts Codeface - Text editor fonts Stock Resources GIF Music Open Source Documents Audio VisualizationLearn CLI Workshoppers - Interactive tutorials Learn to Program Speaking Tech Videos Dive into Machine Learning Computer HistorySecurity Application Security Security CTF - Capture The Flag Malware Analysis Android Security Hacking Honeypots Incident ResponseContent Management System Umbraco Refinery CMSMiscellaneous JSON Discounts for Student Developers Slack CommunitiesConferences GeoJSON Sysadmin Radio Awesome Analytics Open Companies REST Selenium Endangered Languages Continuous Delivery Services Engineering Free for Developers Bitcoin Answers - Stack Overflow, Quora, etc Sketch - OS X design app Places to Post Your Startup PCAPTools Remote Jobs Boilerplate Projects Readme Tools Styleguides Design and Development Guides Software Engineering Blogs Self Hosted FOSS Production Apps Gulp AMA - Ask Me Anything AnswersOpen Source Photography OpenGL Productivity GraphQL Transit Research Tools Niche Job Boards Data Visualization Social Media Share Links JSON Datasets Microservices Unicode Code Points Internet of Things Beginner-Friendly Projects Bluetooth Beacons Programming Interviews Ripple - Open source distributed settlement network Katas Tools for Activism TAP - Test Anything Protocol Robotics MQTT - "Internet of Things" connectivity protocol Hacking Spots For Girls Vorpal - Node.js CLI framework OKR Methodology - Goal setting & communication best practices Vulkan LaTeX - Typesetting language Network Analysis Economics - An economist's starter kit
Few more resources:
submitted by Programming-Help to Programming_Languages [link] [comments]

Happy Halloween! Audit Statuses of Canadian Cryptocurrency Exchanges

Halloween is a wonderful time of year!
Businesses and consumers alike dress up, children go door to door naively asking strangers for candy, and everyone parties celebrating things like death and evil.
In the spirit of Halloween storytelling, let me tell you a scary story.
There once was a Canadian cryptocurrency exchange. It had one of the simplest user interfaces, the CEO was well known in person and trusted throughout the country for over half a decade, and it had several deposit and withdrawal methods. It was the first to register as a money services business and for much of its history, it was one of the most legally compliant exchanges. It even looked to be headed for public listing on the TSX. The exchange operated for 6 years, assuring users that all funds “are stored in cold storage, using some of the most secure cryptographic procedures possible.” Unfortunately, while we celebrate Halloween by dressing up and wearing masks once a year, the wonderful people who brought us this exchange played “dress up” for over half a decade and time will only tell if there are any more “masks” to come off in this story.
There’s no better or more fitting time to explore one of the darkest realities of the Canadian cryptocurrency space - exactly what is backing any of the cryptocurrency on Canadian exchanges. It’s easy to lose sight that there are real people behind these funds. Most people spend most waking hours working for their money. It literally is their lives. Impacts to victims are not just financial, but psychological and social as well. Victims of exchange fraud go through depression, anxiety, and trauma. They lose their trust and faith in humanity. They withdraw from friends and family in shame and humility.
In the spirit of exploring dark and evil things, let’s examine exactly what evidence there is that any of your crypto is backed on any Canadian exchange. This is a continuation of research I’ve been working on since May/June. I hope it will be enlightening and help you better protect your funds that you worked hard for.

I’ve done a detailed analysis of all Canadian exchanges I could find that handle any sort of custody of funds, and grouped them into 3 categories:

Non-Audited Exchanges (“trust us, we haven't spent your money, we promise")

Bitvo - The service “utilizes a proprietary cold storage solution”. Proprietary, as in, definitely better than established non-proprietary solutions. If you can’t withdraw, they “will credit your account for [their] withdrawal fee”. They’re not an MSB that I could find, nor are they audited.
Coinfield - MSB. No audit. Luckily it’s the "most secure trading platform in Canada" - though apparently not the other 150+ countries, including Estonia where they’re based. No matter which country you pick, the “Security” page still says "most secure trading platform in Canada".
Coinsmart - MSB. Not sure what "[i]ndustry leading cold storage" is, but luckily they’re so "accountable to [their] clients, community and to each other" and "committed to being open and honest" that they don’t need any audit.
Coinut - MSB. Also "the most secure cryptocurrency exchange platform". In addition to not using multi-sig and "not us[ing] USB drives, as the online computer may be infected with virus", they also don’t use audits.
Einstein - You can get “your money deposited and withdrawn faster than any other exchange”. As one customer said "With so many hacks and exit scams, it gives me confidence knowing Einstein is backed by hard-working people just like me." Just check the user experience on their subreddit from their "220,000+ satisfied customers".
EZ-BTC - As they said, “All your coins are kept in cold storage. They’re safe.” They have “strong security”. The supposed presence of physical ATMs was one of the strategies to build customer confidence and they promised 9% annual return on stored funds.
NDAX - MSB. Luckily also “Canada’s most secure trading platform” with "fast withdrawals". I couldn’t find any audit but at least there’s a full page risk disclosure and disclaimer. You can sleep peacefully knowing that they’re legally protected.
Netcoins - MSB. The best assurance I could find of solvency is that they “can process large transactions”. Although they don’t waste time with audits or links at the bottom of their website, apparently “[a]ll transactions happen quickly and securely” “within the same day”.
Newton - MSB. “No-fees”! Your funds are stored in the "professional custody" of Balance, which doesn’t appear to be a registered MSB. I couldn't find any audit of the funds but they "audit [their] policies and controls". They "publish the reports", but I couldn't find any reports. Simply storing funds somewhere else doesn’t give any assurance they cover customer balances.
QuadrigaCX - Operated since 2013, with “vast cryptocurrency reserves” right up to the end. "Bitcoins that are funded in QuadrigaCX are stored in cold storage, using some of the most secure cryptographic procedures possible." Their "cryptographic" procedures are so secure that nobody can access any funds, even now!
Shakepay - MSB. Many will trust the raccoon mascot promising “commission-free” trading. No audit found but the “majority of all digital assets on Shakepay are stored securely offline”. Whatever this means, it’s good to know that up to half might not be.

Audited Exchanges ("so and so swears we didn't spend your money, you can trust them, we showed them once before")

Bitbuy - MSB
Coinberry - MSB
Coinsquare - MSB
Kraken - Not a registered MSB in Canada (that I could find)

Proof of Reserves ("here's your money, right here right now on the blockchain, and here's a proof that we included your balance in that total")

Rather than depend on outdated audits (or lack thereof), it’s actually possible to use the blockchain and cryptography to enable a public real-time audit. This can give assurance to every customer that their balances are fully backed. Giving everyone the ability to check the integrity of balances will keep us all safer. It immediately exposes any fraud, and in most major hacking cases there was advanced hacking that went unnoticed ranging from months (Bitgrail), or years (Mt. Gox). Having an aware public reduces the number of people trading on fraudulent exchanges, and can pressure the exchange to shut down trading or resolve the hack faster, so less funds are permanently lost.
To help explain exactly what this is and how it works, I’ve started a detailed tutorial. I did not come up with this algorithm - it was created in 2014 by a guy named Gregory Maxwell. Sometimes cryptography can be hard to understand. Hopefully this tutorial is simple:

< < Take Our Proof of Reserves Tutorial > >


Given what can often be at stake, I had hoped that maybe one of the “audited” exchanges might embrace Proof of Reserves. Sadly I haven’t had any such luck.
Bitbuy:
Coinberry:
Kraken:
As such, the bottom line is that present exchanges don’t want to share public keys and offer the kind of transparency which is necessary to enable customers to know their funds are backed. Attempting to get answers doesn’t reveal them, and I’m left with an unnerving silence not unlike the end of Halloween night, like I’m asking questions nobody should ask.

Having spent the last 8 months of my life watching and being part of a large group of people suffer through a grueling bankruptcy, where we’ll be “lucky” to only lose 90% of our funds, I want this fixed. I don’t want to live in a reality where fraud can happen just buying/selling on the largest and most trusted exchanges. Especially now that I’ve learned blockchain provides the capability for even greater transparency and a level of public audit far beyond even what's possible with fiat.
If you feel the same way, I invite you to join Quadriga Initiative, where we are fighting for a Proof of Reserves future and also enabling businesses to help Quadriga victims with an innovative token recovery project. Every sign-up helps us reach our goal and launch the project!

If any information in this post is incorrect, please let me know so I can fix it! Thanks! I’m happy to update the audit status of any exchange given reasonable evidence, or provide a review of any other custodial exchange I might have missed.
submitted by azoundria2 to QuadrigaInitiative [link] [comments]

Subreddit Stats: CryptoTechnology top posts from 2017-12-23 to 2020-01-20 15:51 PDT

Period: 758.36 days
Submissions Comments
Total 956 13660
Rate (per day) 1.26 18.01
Unique Redditors 584 3144
Combined Score 21553 44566

Top Submitters' Top Submissions

  1. 1166 points, 43 submissions: Neophyte-
    1. "Do you need a Blockchain?" - this paper is fantastic, everyone should read this before evaluating a coin and if requires a block chain to solve a solution the coin is promising to solve. (136 points, 41 comments)
    2. Do any of you foresee a crypto being widely adopted as a general purpose payment coin? nano, btc, btccash etc (take your pick). I think it won't happen for reasons in this post. What do you think? (59 points, 54 comments)
    3. Noticed the huge rise of EOS lately what does it have over NEO and ethereum and to a lesser extent Cardano? I tried researching it, but wasn't sold. (54 points, 55 comments)
    4. Hard Problems in Cryptocurrency: Five Years Later ~Vitalik (46 points, 1 comment)
    5. I had a Q&A with Bruno head architect / CEO of oyster, thought you guys might like it. (45 points, 2 comments)
    6. A good article that explains in simple terms how Eth2 works, how it will be rolled out and migrated from eth1 (42 points, 4 comments)
    7. DAI the stablecoin can now be transferred GAS free (article explaining how it works via new MCD DAI contract). This holds alot of promise for the so called "Web3" (40 points, 8 comments)
    8. Veriblock is consuming 27% of bitcoins block space - what does this mean for bitcoins future? (39 points, 16 comments)
    9. Vitalik: Alternative proposal for early eth1 <-> eth2 merge (38 points, 3 comments)
    10. Is launching a PoW permissionless blockchain still possible today? or would it be too susceptible to a 51% attack? (37 points, 37 comments)
  2. 578 points, 16 submissions: crypto_ha
    1. Why is Ripple considered a cryptocurrency (by many)? (109 points, 63 comments)
    2. So reportedly there are serious vulnerabilities found in EOS’ code. And it seems like those are more than just random software bugs. (97 points, 29 comments)
    3. Guide: How to get started with Blockchain development? (60 points, 6 comments)
    4. A newly found vulnerability in Nano's Android wallet (44 points, 12 comments)
    5. The history and state of Ethereum's Casper research - Vitalik Buterin (39 points, 4 comments)
    6. What is the difference between Sidechain vs Child Chain vs Off Chain? (39 points, 12 comments)
    7. EOS mainnet is official live (finally), but... (36 points, 24 comments)
    8. Bitcoin's "doomsday" economics - Bank of International Settlements (34 points, 23 comments)
    9. How Wall Street’s embrace could undermine Bitcoin (30 points, 9 comments)
    10. Ethereum ERC 1497: DApp Dispute Evidence Standard (24 points, 0 comments)
  3. 513 points, 20 submissions: ndha1995
    1. Ethereum Classic is currently being 51% attacked (103 points, 31 comments)
    2. Why are there so many garbage posts the past 24 hours? (58 points, 10 comments)
    3. Google Unveils 72-Qubit Quantum Processor With Low Error Rates (48 points, 24 comments)
    4. IOTA's Network-Bound PoW consensus, is it feasible? (42 points, 13 comments)
    5. The Challenges of Investigating Cryptocurrencies and Blockchain Related Crime (29 points, 7 comments)
    6. Deep dive into zk-STARKs with Vitalik Buterin's blog posts (26 points, 3 comments)
    7. Tether discussion thread (26 points, 21 comments)
    8. Vitalik Buterin Proposes a Consensus Algorithm That Requires Only 1% to Be Honest (24 points, 8 comments)
    9. Can somebody compare Qtum vs. NEO, technology-wise? (E.g. PoS vs. PoW; smart contract protocols...) (21 points, 15 comments)
    10. Introduction to Non Fungible Tokens (NFTs) (21 points, 9 comments)
  4. 377 points, 16 submissions: turtleflax
    1. Around 13% of DASH's privateSends are traceable to their origin (69 points, 3 comments)
    2. "Big Bang" attack could leverage Monero's dynamic blocksize to bloat the blockchain to 30TB in only 36 hours (52 points, 3 comments)
    3. The case for the obsolescence of Proof of Work and why 2018 will be the year of Proof of Stake (41 points, 29 comments)
    4. Monero vs PIVX: The First Scheduled Privacy Coin Debate Thread on /CryptoCurrency (38 points, 12 comments)
    5. Introducing the Privacy Coin Matrix, a cross-team collaboration comparing 20 privacy coins in 100 categories (26 points, 25 comments)
    6. Do permissioned blockchains have any merits? (25 points, 23 comments)
    7. The State of Hashing Algorithms — The Why, The How, and The Future (21 points, 4 comments)
    8. How Zerocoin Works in 5 Minutes (19 points, 5 comments)
    9. Errors made by Satoshi (17 points, 8 comments)
    10. How Much Privacy is Enough? Threats, Scaling, and Trade-offs in Blockchain Privacy Protocols - Ian Miers (Cornell Tech, Zerocoin, Zerocash) (17 points, 4 comments)
  5. 321 points, 6 submissions: Qwahzi
    1. Technical comparison of LIGHTNING vs TANGLE vs HASHGRAPH vs NANO (133 points, 37 comments)
    2. Addressing Nano's weaknesses (bandwidth usage and disk IO). Nano voting traffic to be reduced by 99.9% by implementing vote by hash, lazy bootstrapping, and reduced vote rebroadcasting (x-post CryptoCurrency) (78 points, 8 comments)
    3. Emergent centralization due to economies of scale (PoW vs DPoS) – Colin LeMahieu (52 points, 37 comments)
    4. Nano community member developing a distributed "mining" service to pay people to do PoW for third-parties (e.g. exchanges, light wallet services, etc) (32 points, 20 comments)
    5. What do you think about OpenCAP, the cryptocurrency alias protocol that mirrors traditional email addresses? (15 points, 12 comments)
    6. Bitcoin would be a calamity, not an economy (11 points, 52 comments)
  6. 256 points, 4 submissions: rockyrainy
    1. Bitcoin Gold hit by Double Spend Attack (51% attack). The Attacker reversed 22 blocks. (179 points, 102 comments)
    2. ZK-starks white paper published (44 points, 16 comments)
    3. [Q] How does a network reach consensus on what time it is? (21 points, 17 comments)
    4. Stateless (no history) Cryptocurrency via snapshots? (12 points, 7 comments)
  7. 244 points, 3 submissions: HSPremier
    1. From a technical standpoint: Why does every blockchain projects need their own coins? (181 points, 50 comments)
    2. What is Reddit's obsession with REQ? (61 points, 43 comments)
    3. What is the technological difference between a privacy coin and a privacy coin platform? Won't a privacy coin platform be more superior than a privacy coin? (2 points, 3 comments)
  8. 234 points, 2 submissions: Realness100
    1. A Guided Reading of Bitcoin’s Original White Paper (202 points, 10 comments)
    2. A Guided Reading of Ethereum's Original White Paper! (32 points, 5 comments)
  9. 185 points, 4 submissions: tracyspacygo
    1. My brief observation of most common Consensus Algorithms (159 points, 49 comments)
    2. What are the main Trends/Challenges for Bitcoin and whole crytpocurrencies industry? (12 points, 33 comments)
    3. Guideline for Newbies: Trying out Bitcoin transactions with TESTNET (7 points, 1 comment)
    4. Most advanced Cryptocurrencies Comparison Table (7 points, 8 comments)
  10. 177 points, 9 submissions: benmdi
    1. What's the best argument against cryptotechnology? I.e. Steelman the cryptocurrency skeptic (43 points, 42 comments)
    2. Would there be interest from this community in crypto resources aimed at developers? If so, what topics? (29 points, 14 comments)
    3. Has the window for bootstrapping a new PoW coin closed? (24 points, 57 comments)
    4. What can we, as a community, learn from the rise & acquisition of GitHub (23 points, 8 comments)
    5. 🍱 Rollup Roundup: Understanding Ethereum's Emerging Layer 2 (19 points, 1 comment)
    6. Video Tutorial: Introducing An Experience Dev To Smart Contract Coding (17 points, 3 comments)
    7. Do we need a blockchain to be decentralized? What questions would you ask a self described fan of decentralization, but blockchain skeptic? (11 points, 19 comments)
    8. ETH Block Rewards And Second Order Effects On Hardware Availability (7 points, 8 comments)
    9. Which Of The Big Tech Companies Is Most Likely To Bring Crypto Mainstream? Here's Why I Think It's Apple (4 points, 7 comments)
  11. 175 points, 9 submissions: galan77
    1. Is the Lightning Network a massive threat to the blockchain? (49 points, 66 comments)
    2. TPS of Lightning Network vs. Sharding, which one does better? (28 points, 7 comments)
    3. Are there any major downsides to sharding? (21 points, 33 comments)
    4. What's the difference between trustlessness and permissionlessness (19 points, 7 comments)
    5. Which consensus algorithm is the best, PoW, PoS, PoAuthority, PoAsset? (18 points, 57 comments)
    6. How can XRP reach 50,000 TPS when they have no sharding and every node has to validate every single transaction. (15 points, 14 comments)
    7. A few questions about the Lightning Network (14 points, 6 comments)
    8. Pascalcoin can do 72,000 tps apparently. Is this legit? The new Nano? (8 points, 39 comments)
    9. How does Ripple's (XRB's) consensus algorithm Proof of Correctness work, are there any downsides? (3 points, 23 comments)
  12. 175 points, 1 submission: ilielezi
    1. Why white papers in crypto world are so unprofessional? (175 points, 88 comments)
  13. 165 points, 6 submissions: CryptoMaximalist
    1. Facebook's Libra (48 points, 55 comments)
    2. “Fake Stake” attacks on some Proof-of-Stake cryptocurrencies responsibly disclosed by researchers from the Decentralized Systems Lab at UIUC (31 points, 9 comments)
    3. Quantum Computing and the Cryptography in Crypto (27 points, 14 comments)
    4. PING and REJECT attacks on ZCash (Patch available) | Stanford Applied Crypto Group (22 points, 1 comment)
    5. Introduction to Cryptography: Part 1 - Jinglan Wang (19 points, 1 comment)
    6. New site howmanyconfs.com shows the amount of time and confirmations of Proof of Work coins to match 6 confirmations on Bitcoin (18 points, 11 comments)
  14. 163 points, 10 submissions: GainsLean
    1. Videos For Developers Who Want To Learn Blockchain In A Practical Way (36 points, 17 comments)
    2. What Do You Want To Learn? (32 points, 20 comments)
    3. Get Involved With The Smart Contract Coding Challenge (25 points, 4 comments)
    4. Solution To $10K Art Prize (25 points, 3 comments)
    5. Blockchain Course Outline Has Been Released - Feedback warranted (22 points, 12 comments)
    6. Introduction To Distributed Systems And Consensus Protocols (9 points, 2 comments)
    7. Are there any closed source crypto wallets? (4 points, 19 comments)
    8. Are there any successful proof of identity projects? (4 points, 8 comments)
    9. SPV Wallets Vs API Wallets (4 points, 1 comment)
    10. 12 Popular Consensus Algorithms - Explained (2 points, 0 comments)
  15. 163 points, 7 submissions: QRCollector
    1. Part 5. I'm writing a series about blockchain tech and possible future security risks. This is the fifth part of the series talking about an advanced vulnerability of BTC. (43 points, 43 comments)
    2. I'm writing a series about blockchain tech and possible future security risks. This is the third part of the series introducing Quantum resistant blockchains. (36 points, 4 comments)
    3. Part 4B. I’m writing a series about blockchain tech and possible future security risks. This is the fourth part of the series explaining the special quality of going quantum resistant from genesis block. (25 points, 21 comments)
    4. Part 6. (Last part) I'm writing a series about blockchain tech and possible future security risks. Failing shortcuts in an attempt to accomplish Quantum Resistance (24 points, 38 comments)
    5. I'm writing a series about blockchain tech and possible future security risks. This is the first part of the series introducing the basic concept of blockchain and what makes it reliable. (23 points, 10 comments)
    6. I'm writing a series about blockchain tech and possible future security risks. This is the fourth part of the series explaining the special quality of going quantum resistant from genesis block. (7 points, 1 comment)
    7. Part 2. I'm writing a series about blockchain tech and possible future security risks. This is the second part of the series: An accessible description of hashing and signature schemes. (5 points, 0 comments)
  16. 162 points, 3 submissions: FashionistaGuru
    1. How do we change the culture around cryptocurrency? (118 points, 54 comments)
    2. Which cryptos have the best new user experience? (30 points, 34 comments)
    3. Why does Apple prevent many crypto apps from entering the App Store? (14 points, 8 comments)
  17. 157 points, 7 submissions: SamsungGalaxyPlayer
    1. Breaking Monero Episodes 1-3: Introduction, Ring Signatures, 0-Decoy and Chain Reactions (45 points, 1 comment)
    2. "No, dPoW Isn't a Perfect Solution" (35 points, 48 comments)
    3. Breaking Mimblewimble’s Privacy Model - Dragonfly Research (27 points, 10 comments)
    4. Breaking Monero (and Zcash) Episodes 7-9: Remote Nodes, Timing Attacks, Poisoned Outputs (EAE Attack) (21 points, 2 comments)
    5. "Attacker Collection of IP Metadata" (18 points, 10 comments)
    6. "Tracing Transactions Across Cryptocurrency Ledgers" Using Shapeshift and Changelly (6 points, 4 comments)
    7. Breaking Monero Episodes 4-6: Chain Splits (Key Image Attack), Input Selection Algorithm, Unusual Ringsize (5 points, 2 comments)
  18. 147 points, 1 submission: shunsaitakahashi
    1. Proof-of-Approval: Stake Based, 1 Block Finality & History Attack Defense (147 points, 4 comments)
  19. 146 points, 6 submissions: themoderndayhercules
    1. "The selfish mining fallacy" explained and debunked (60 points, 8 comments)
    2. A Discussion of Stable coins and Decentralized Oracles (35 points, 8 comments)
    3. A Selfish Mining Double Spending attack Simulator (25 points, 2 comments)
    4. Why reputation systems don't work (15 points, 12 comments)
    5. A better incentivization for Swarm (6 points, 0 comments)
    6. When Mises met Szabo - A Discussion of the value of Bitcoin (5 points, 16 comments)
  20. 143 points, 7 submissions: KomodoWorld
    1. Komodo Platform's core developer and founder jl777 has started his own blog on Medium. The blog is aimed for senior developers who want to learn about blockchain. (46 points, 15 comments)
    2. Delayed Proof of Work (dPoW) security explained (36 points, 46 comments)
    3. Proof-of-Gameplay (19 points, 3 comments)
    4. Good guide for getting started with the Custom Consensus tech for Komodo-based blockchains (17 points, 0 comments)
    5. Cross-chain migration of coins with Crypto Conditions - by smk762 (12 points, 0 comments)
    6. A step-by-step example of working with a Crypto Conditions based Oracle - by smk762 (10 points, 0 comments)
    7. Changing consensus rules on the fly with Crypto Conditions (3 points, 0 comments)
  21. 141 points, 8 submissions: Stormy1997
    1. What technical/business advantages does a private blockchain have over a SQL server? (49 points, 79 comments)
    2. Is sharding to scale bad? (24 points, 28 comments)
    3. How would one create a fiat gateway theoretically? (19 points, 19 comments)
    4. Looking for Stellar smart contract/side chain code examples (16 points, 1 comment)
    5. Question - Securing personal information on a centralized server with user-owned keys (13 points, 3 comments)
    6. How do blockchains/smart contracts communicate with oracles? (10 points, 4 comments)
    7. Bandwidth scaling for TPS (8 points, 2 comments)
    8. Best method to transmit detailed data between two parties via existing platforms (2 points, 1 comment)
  22. 141 points, 3 submissions: seventyfiver
    1. Why does Ethereum use Solidity while other ecosystems like NEO stick with popular ones like Java and C#? (94 points, 26 comments)
    2. Chainlink's initial Go implementation went live this morning. Has anyone reviewed the code and can comment on it's quality? (40 points, 3 comments)
    3. What are some great books on cryptoeconomics or blockchain technology? (7 points, 4 comments)
  23. 134 points, 6 submissions: johnny_milkshakes
    1. Sub dedicated to DAG based coins (42 points, 8 comments)
    2. Thoughts on this? (28 points, 38 comments)
    3. This is very interesting (24 points, 19 comments)
    4. Educational presentation by Clara Shikhelman (18 points, 0 comments)
    5. Ethics question. (12 points, 40 comments)
    6. How to scale on chain? (10 points, 30 comments)
  24. 127 points, 4 submissions: sukitrebek
    1. What are you currently obsessed with, and why? (58 points, 150 comments)
    2. Crypto-based social network without a cryptocurrency. (42 points, 23 comments)
    3. How does underlying architecture affect what kinds of applications are possible? (17 points, 3 comments)
    4. Holochain vs. Radix DLT (10 points, 11 comments)
  25. 126 points, 1 submission: RufusTheFirefly
    1. Everytime I try to investigate the technology behind Cardano(Ada), I come across the words "scientific" and "peer-reviewed" over and over but almost no actual details. Can someone fill how this coin actually works and where they are in development? (126 points, 49 comments)
  26. 112 points, 1 submission: rocksolid77
    1. Can we have a real debate about the Bitcoin scaling issue? (112 points, 89 comments)
  27. 110 points, 4 submissions: kelluk
    1. What one can learn from browsing 30 million Ethereum addresses (72 points, 21 comments)
    2. I wanted to categorize all coins/tokens, and this is my proposal (23 points, 33 comments)
    3. Should whitepapers be understood by ordinary people? (10 points, 41 comments)
    4. Querying the Ethereum blockchain: how to & what to? (5 points, 5 comments)
  28. 107 points, 1 submission: NewDietTrend
    1. Outside of currency and voting, blockchain is awful and shouldnt be used. Can anyone explain where blockchain is worth the cost? (107 points, 166 comments)
  29. 105 points, 1 submission: insette
    1. /CryptoTech PSA: there are broadly TWO TYPES of Decentralized Exchanges. Which type are you investing in? (105 points, 55 comments)
  30. 103 points, 3 submissions: dtheme
    1. How to accept crypto payments for digital downloads if you are a small business? Solutions, e-commerce sites are lacking (46 points, 38 comments)
    2. How many 24 letter seeds and "Bitcoin" keys can there be? (34 points, 24 comments)
    3. Is there any reason why the big tech companies are not getting into crypto? (23 points, 36 comments)
  31. 103 points, 3 submissions: dvnielng
    1. Why do so many of these businesses need a token? (Unsure) (61 points, 86 comments)
    2. DAPPS - Only coins that have intrinsic value? Ethereum , Neo? (31 points, 10 comments)
    3. How could blockchain work for expensive purchases/escrow? (11 points, 2 comments)
  32. 101 points, 1 submission: kickso
    1. Is NANO everything it says it is? (101 points, 96 comments)
  33. 98 points, 3 submissions: heart_mind_body
    1. How can we breathe some life into this sub? (56 points, 22 comments)
    2. Can anyone give an example for a technology that provides a "public permissioned blockchain"? (28 points, 16 comments)
    3. Can we do a discussion on ICON and "clusters of private chains connected to a public chain" ? (14 points, 13 comments)
  34. 97 points, 8 submissions: kelraku
    1. Thoughts on Mimblewimble? (23 points, 13 comments)
    2. Has anyone looked at the lelantus protocol? (18 points, 6 comments)
    3. How much control do developers have over the coins (18 points, 6 comments)
    4. Lesser known protocols? (11 points, 17 comments)
    5. Zerocoin and Blockchain Analysis (9 points, 5 comments)
    6. Zerocoin vs Cryptonote (7 points, 14 comments)
    7. Lightning network privacy (6 points, 13 comments)
    8. Integrity of the DAG (5 points, 17 comments)
  35. 96 points, 6 submissions: blockstasy
    1. How to Get to One Million Devs (32 points, 12 comments)
    2. The Decade in Blockchain — 2010 to 2020 in Review (27 points, 4 comments)
    3. Ethereum by the Numbers – The Year of 2019 (26 points, 9 comments)
    4. Knowledge Drop: Mining and the role it plays with the Ethereum blockchain (5 points, 0 comments)
    5. A great article that explains Ethereum’s Muir Glacier Update (4 points, 0 comments)
    6. Youtube Silences Crypto Community (2 points, 6 comments)
  36. 93 points, 3 submissions: OneOverNever
    1. Which is the last WHITE PAPER you've read that's truly impacted you? (77 points, 81 comments)
    2. [CMV] Bitcoin's intrinsic technological value. (14 points, 29 comments)
    3. What are some weak points that still hold XVG back from becoming a top player in crypto? (Technically speaking, not marketing and etc.) (2 points, 19 comments)
  37. 93 points, 3 submissions: ryano-ark
    1. (ARK) ACES Completes Integration of ARK Channels for Two-way Transfers for Easy ICOs When Paired With ARK Deployer (Push-Button-Blockchains) (57 points, 5 comments)
    2. (ARK) ACES Releases Fast (Ansible) Deployments for all ACES Applications. (23 points, 4 comments)
    3. A Future of Cryptocurrencies and Blockchains (13 points, 3 comments)
  38. 92 points, 2 submissions: BobUltra
    1. Our blockchains are all centralized! (51 points, 34 comments)
    2. List of qualities needed to dethrone Bitcoin. (41 points, 43 comments)
  39. 90 points, 1 submission: refreshx2
    1. CMV: It doesn't make sense for (crypto)companies to create coins linked to their tech (90 points, 18 comments)
  40. 89 points, 1 submission: perceptron01
    1. What does Nano do better than Steem? (89 points, 55 comments)
  41. 87 points, 1 submission: Shuk
    1. How does one begin to develop an employable skill in blockchain development? (87 points, 25 comments)
  42. 87 points, 1 submission: conorohiggins
    1. I spent three weeks researching and writing a huge guide to stablecoins. Enjoy! (87 points, 36 comments)
  43. 86 points, 1 submission: Bacon_Hero
    1. ELI5: Why did it take so long for blockchain technology to be created? (86 points, 66 comments)
  44. 85 points, 3 submissions: theFoot58
    1. If crypto now is like 'the Internet' of the past, where are we? (65 points, 53 comments)
    2. If the Internet had its Genesis Block, what would it be? (14 points, 9 comments)
    3. Coin grouping - ruby and CryptoCompare API (6 points, 1 comment)
  45. 85 points, 1 submission: youngm2
    1. Which decentralised exchange has the most promise for 2018? (85 points, 89 comments)
  46. 84 points, 4 submissions: bLbGoldeN
    1. On Mass Adoption of Cryptocurrencies (28 points, 68 comments)
    2. Join the Bloom team for our first tech AMA tomorrow (Tuesday, March 13th) at 7 PM GMT! (23 points, 2 comments)
    3. Join the Decred team for an AMA - Friday, June 1st from 19:00 to 22:00 UTC (17 points, 10 comments)
    4. Join the district0x team for an AMA Monday, April 2nd at 5:00 PM (GMT) (16 points, 0 comments)
  47. 82 points, 2 submissions: SubsequentDownfall
    1. Has a 51% attack ever been witnessed? (45 points, 46 comments)
    2. Is a DAG coin like RaiBlocks able to be private like Monero? (37 points, 40 comments)
  48. 82 points, 2 submissions: guidre
    1. Tron and other source Code (42 points, 24 comments)
    2. Why Will companies adopt blockchain, the user interface is complex and i'm not sure that many companies want all their internal dealings made public. (40 points, 19 comments)
  49. 81 points, 4 submissions: solar128
    1. New Atomic Swap Tools Released (35 points, 4 comments)
    2. Using Blockchain to make a censorship-resistant Reddit (28 points, 14 comments)
    3. Best security practices for addressing Spectre & Meltdown (13 points, 0 comments)
    4. Influence of on-chain governance weighted by wealth - good or bad? (5 points, 2 comments)
  50. 81 points, 2 submissions: Blockchainsapiens
    1. Blockchain study finds 0.00% success rate and vendors don't call back when asked for evidence (47 points, 30 comments)
    2. The elephant in the room: would the public ever use a volatile currency over a stable currency? (34 points, 45 comments)
  51. 81 points, 1 submission: Mycryptopedia
    1. Understanding the Tech Behind RaiBlocks (81 points, 7 comments)
  52. 81 points, 1 submission: davidvanbeveren
    1. Article thoroughly analysing / comparing IOTA and RaiBlocks (x-post /CryptoCurrency) (81 points, 10 comments)
  53. 77 points, 4 submissions: DeleteMyOldAccount
    1. HD Wallets Explained: What they are, and how to make them coin agnostic (28 points, 11 comments)
    2. Bitcoin Cash May 15th fork (23 points, 22 comments)
    3. So you want to build a Bitcoin HD wallet? Part 1 (23 points, 3 comments)
    4. Applications of Blockchain in Supply Chain (3 points, 9 comments)
  54. 76 points, 3 submissions: kryptofinger
    1. Why would anyone bother using any DPOS coins for dapps like Eos over normal systems like AWS? (44 points, 104 comments)
    2. Could a state backed privacy coin work? (22 points, 32 comments)
    3. Thoughts on Elastos? (10 points, 8 comments)
  55. 76 points, 1 submission: francohab
    1. 55% of the Nano representative nodes are "official representatives", presumably held by developers. How big of an issue is that? (76 points, 46 comments)
  56. 75 points, 2 submissions: MerkleChainsaw
    1. The biggest challenge for cryptocurrencies and how to mitigate it (73 points, 37 comments)
    2. Short and long term design tradeoffs in crypto (2 points, 2 comments)
  57. 75 points, 1 submission: jatsignwork
    1. Raiblocks & Spam (75 points, 60 comments)
  58. 74 points, 1 submission: behindtext
    1. Hello, this is Jake Yocom-Piatt. Ask me anything about Decred! (74 points, 49 comments)
  59. 73 points, 2 submissions: TexasRadical83
    1. Why use a new "currency" at all? (40 points, 48 comments)
    2. Why are big price increases for crypto a good thing? (33 points, 41 comments)

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  33. alexrecuenco (145 points, 18 comments)
  34. BobUltra (144 points, 88 comments)
  35. SpamCamel (135 points, 22 comments)
  36. InterdisciplinaryHum (133 points, 107 comments)
  37. theglitteringone (132 points, 10 comments)
  38. ChocolateSunrise (128 points, 23 comments)
  39. PM_ME_UR_QUINES (125 points, 4 comments)
  40. narwhale111 (122 points, 15 comments)
  41. pepe_le_shoe (121 points, 47 comments)
  42. Darius510 (119 points, 39 comments)
  43. glen-hodl (118 points, 21 comments)
  44. HOG_ZADDY (117 points, 23 comments)
  45. coranos2 (116 points, 44 comments)
  46. etherenvoy (116 points, 15 comments)
  47. johnny_milkshakes (115 points, 55 comments)
  48. galan77 (115 points, 52 comments)
  49. hybridsole (113 points, 40 comments)
  50. funciton (113 points, 8 comments)
  51. Mr0ldy (110 points, 24 comments)
  52. Corm (109 points, 42 comments)
  53. cryptoscopia (109 points, 7 comments)
  54. ReportFromHell (106 points, 39 comments)
  55. broscientologist (105 points, 26 comments)
  56. straytjacquet (104 points, 28 comments)
  57. Quadling (101 points, 24 comments)
  58. BlockEnthusiast (101 points, 17 comments)
  59. thats_not_montana (99 points, 37 comments)
  60. TheRealMotherOfOP (98 points, 27 comments)
  61. yarauuta (96 points, 11 comments)
  62. pegasuspect93 (96 points, 1 comment)
  63. andrew_bao (93 points, 40 comments)
  64. samdotla (93 points, 6 comments)
  65. melodious_punk (91 points, 34 comments)
  66. Mquantum (91 points, 31 comments)
  67. TJ_Hooker15 (91 points, 27 comments)
  68. NoFaptain99 (91 points, 3 comments)
  69. ilielezi (87 points, 10 comments)
  70. Raapop (87 points, 2 comments)
  71. Allways_Wrong (86 points, 36 comments)
  72. bLbGoldeN (86 points, 19 comments)
  73. ResIpsaLoquiturrr (86 points, 15 comments)
  74. kabelman93 (85 points, 29 comments)
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  84. StupidRandomGuy (77 points, 35 comments)
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  86. SnootyEuropean (77 points, 5 comments)
  87. cryptogainz (76 points, 14 comments)
  88. frequentlywrong (76 points, 4 comments)
  89. the_defiant (76 points, 4 comments)
  90. BrangdonJ (75 points, 28 comments)
  91. hendrik_v (75 points, 7 comments)
  92. solar128 (74 points, 18 comments)
  93. foobazzler (74 points, 8 comments)
  94. ginger_beer_m (73 points, 35 comments)
  95. kAhmij (73 points, 25 comments)
  96. DeleteMyOldAccount (73 points, 20 comments)
  97. sn0wr4in (73 points, 9 comments)
  98. Dyslectic_Sabreur (72 points, 5 comments)
  99. X7spyWqcRY (71 points, 8 comments)
  100. Krapser (70 points, 5 comments)

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  4. Why white papers in crypto world are so unprofessional? by ilielezi (175 points, 88 comments)
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  6. Proof-of-Approval: Stake Based, 1 Block Finality & History Attack Defense by shunsaitakahashi (147 points, 4 comments)
  7. "Do you need a Blockchain?" - this paper is fantastic, everyone should read this before evaluating a coin and if requires a block chain to solve a solution the coin is promising to solve. by Neophyte- (136 points, 41 comments)
  8. Technical comparison of LIGHTNING vs TANGLE vs HASHGRAPH vs NANO by Qwahzi (133 points, 37 comments)
  9. Everytime I try to investigate the technology behind Cardano(Ada), I come across the words "scientific" and "peer-reviewed" over and over but almost no actual details. Can someone fill how this coin actually works and where they are in development? by RufusTheFirefly (126 points, 49 comments)
  10. How do we change the culture around cryptocurrency? by FashionistaGuru (118 points, 54 comments)

Top Comments

  1. 160 points: holomntn's comment in ELI5: Why did it take so long for blockchain technology to be created?
  2. 121 points: KnifeOfPi2's comment in How do we change the culture around cryptocurrency?
  3. 105 points: theglitteringone's comment in Outside of currency and voting, blockchain is awful and shouldnt be used. Can anyone explain where blockchain is worth the cost?
  4. 102 points: benthecarman's comment in If crypto now is like 'the Internet' of the past, where are we?
  5. 96 points: pegasuspect93's comment in If crypto now is like 'the Internet' of the past, where are we?
  6. 95 points: bannercoin's comment in Realistically, why would anybody expect the startup crypto platforms to beat out the corporate giants who are developing their own Blockchain as a Service (BaaS) solutions? Ex. IBM, SAP, JP Morgan...
  7. 83 points: AlexCoventry's comment in Ethereum private key with all zeroes leads to an account with 5000$ on it
  8. 82 points: deleted's comment in Is blockchain really useful ?
  9. 81 points: signos_de_admiracion's comment in Why white papers in crypto world are so unprofessional?
  10. 78 points: NoFaptain99's comment in Why do so many of these businesses need a token? (Unsure)
Generated with BBoe's Subreddit Stats
submitted by subreddit_stats to subreddit_stats [link] [comments]

A tutorial for Tails linux, to stay safe on Internet.

I'm not so sure this will be a help or not, quite sure that official guide is more reliable than this. anyway that's what I have here. If this article contains any kinds of misleading or error, please let me know in the comments.
A tutorial for tails linux, to stay safe on the Internet.
In today's circumstances, it's good to put more effort on maintain a low profile on Internet, or atleast learn how to do that.
If you already have a computer at home, you need to consider to use Tails linux if safety is what your concern about.
Access to https://tails.boum.org/ then follow download instructions.
The idea of tails is, it will anonymize your entire connection on Internet by using Tor network. So no one will discover your identity without lots of effort.
Not only that, once you do shutdown your device, it no longer holds any information. That means, other one can't find any evidence from your device.
Also if you still want to storage some text on tails, The easiest way is hide that in online email account.
At first, open text editor that preinstalled in tails. https://www.reddit.com/tails/comments/bm65w7/tails_faq_what_happened_to_the_pgp_clipboard_in/?utm_medium=android_app&utm_source=share
Then, follow the instruction to encrypt your text by passwords and paste it on email account through tor browser. Do not use that account to communicate to others, just keep it in secret. https://tails.boum.org/doc/encryption_and_privacy/gpgapplet/passphrase_encryption/index.en.html
If you are about to send messages through email, this instruction could be handy. https://tails.boum.org/doc/encryption_and_privacy/gpgapplet/public-key_cryptography/index.en.html You needs to learn about PGP first, tho.use XMPP is the either easier or safer plan.
You can encrypt other type of files by using Archive manager(give a right click on the file), but the computer gets freeze by that occasionally.
I strongly recommend to use Veracrypt hidden volume instead of build a Persistent storage feature, or LUCKS encrypted drive for linux that available on tails for both send/storage purposes.
In that way, you'll get two of passwords for one encrypted storage. If you are forced to reveal your password by others, you have a option to reveal a fake one.
On top of that, if you use another USB for that purpose, you don't have to slow down Tails itself. Persistent storage is tends to be fragile, I occasionally toast an entire data during excessive use. https://www.veracrypt.fen/Hidden%20Volume.html https://tails.boum.org/doc/encryption_and_privacy/veracrypt/index.en.html
You need to use other OSs for create new volumes. Linux is safer than windows I guess, but it takes an effort.
IIRC, you should check "I use hidden volume" radio button during type the password. Otherwise your hidden password doesn't simply work. Don't get confused by that.
Not only that, Tails has the Mac address spoofing function by default. Mac address is the unique identifier for your device. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/MAC_address
That function also increases anonymity on Internet. it's important when you go outside because even if you killed GPS function on your devices, it still leave a Mac address on wifi router or 3G/LTE cellular module nearby. So someone still can trace your location.
Also just in case if your government decides to not allow you to connect tor network, you should read this article first. https://tails.boum.org/doc/first_steps/startup_options/bridge_mode/index.en.html
But if every each of instruction seems failed to helps you, bring your device(with Mac address spoofing function) outside and connect to the Free wifi. https://freetoursbyfoot.com/where-find-free-wifi-london/
It's relatively safe since either of wifi or device doesn't leave the information that directly leads to you, but be aware on surveillance camera nearby. don't stay there too long, or use one spot too frequently.
I know laptops is too cumbersome to carry around, you have a option to choose something like a windows tablet, a stick pc along with touch screen or a Tv box. not sure on which kind of stuff do the best job unfortunately.
For communication, you need to build the safest/robust assembly point on Internet. The very best option available is XMPP Pidgin chat client.
It's pre-installed in the tails. https://tails.boum.org/doc/anonymous_internet/pidgin/index.en.html As you expected, you can start a group chat. https://superuser.com/questions/1440212/is-there-any-way-to-create-a-group-in-pidgin-like-in-whatsapp
There is couple things you can't do on Tor network or tails Linux.
First, you should read these articles. https://www.hongkiat.com/blog/do-donts-tor-network/amp/ https://tails.boum.org/doc/about/warning/index.en.html https://2019.www.torproject.org/docs/faq.html.en
Since tails is lots more robust than Tor browser bundle on windows, you can ignore the most of issues in Tor browser. Still you have to aware the risk on this.
Not only that, couple of things is getting harder to achieve through Tor.
At first, some website like Twitter, Reddit or YouTube tends to reject to create an account. If that was just a couple of exit nodes, maybe restart the browser might do the trick. https://tor.stackexchange.com/questions/19536/cant-use-reddit-on-tor-what-do-i-do
But if entire exit nodes are rejected by provider, Web based proxy gives you a chance. If that doesn't work, I'd say you should find someone who will to post your messages on viral media.
Secondly, even if you using tails, thats not means you can pay for something anonymously.
If you need to use paid Web base proxy or whatever you want, it's also safer to use anonymous cryptocurrency such as Zcash or monero. not sure how safe are they, pre-installed wallet(Electrum) only supports bitcoin. so you need to use web based wallets.
Or if someone donated a bitcoins to your anonymous wallet, it's safe to use that one through Tor.
submitted by dozenspileofash to HongKong [link] [comments]

Ripple Subreddit Rules, Helpful Links & Answers to Common Questions - READ BEFORE POSTING

You must read our rules before participating in Ripple
Helpful links and answers to common questions will be updated frequently so check back often
 
 
Ripple Subreddit Rules
https://www.reddit.com/Ripple/wiki/rules
 
Helpful Links
Ripple Insights - Top 9 Frequently Asked Questions About Ripple and XRP (Jan 18, 2018)
Ripple’s Ultimate Strategy; why XRP will increase in value
Removing inefficiency of international payments with XRP
Reasons to expect XRP to be the most popular bridge asset
"XRP is competitive now in the USD/MXN corridor"
Ripple's Decentralization Strategy Update
XRP Market Performance
List of Ripple Partnerships and RippleNet Implementations
 
People to Follow
Ripple on Twitter
Brad Garlinghouse, Chief Executive Officer at Ripple
Yoshitaka Kitao, executive chairman, CEO and president of SBI Holdings, Inc.
David Schwartz, Chief Cryptographer at Ripple | aka u/sjoelkatz
Stefan Thomas, Former CTO at Ripple, Co-creator of Interledger. Founder at Coil
Patrick Griffin, Senior Vice President of Business Development at Ripple
Miguel Vias, Head of XRP Markets at Ripple
Warren Paul Anderson, Product Manager, xRapid/XRP at Ripple
 
Hodor's XRP Blog
TplusZero - research & analysis on #XRP
 
Most Discussed Topics and Answers
● The Case Against BankCoin - Banks need an independent digital asset to enable truly efficient settlement
● Ripple Technology → Fast Payments → XRP → Fast Settlement
● Solving the chicken and egg problem - FI's bridging payments with XRP & companies saving money by holding XRP
● Banks hold XRP under a contractual agreement | Build liquidity to bridge payments to raise the demand for XRP
● How the global adoption of xRapid (XRP liquidity tool) would affect the value of XRP
● Besides instant cross-border payment settlement, XRP can capture other use cases, value that doesn't yet exist
● XRP Ledger has numerous technological advantages over blockchain systems that use proof of work
● Ripple is committed to making the XRP Ledger as decentralized as they possibly can
● Quantum-resistant signature schemes - Adding a new scheme is easy and fast
 
XRP Wallets
You need 20 XRP to activate a XRP wallet. Fees can be changed by the validators through the voting process.
The reserve requirement protects the XRP Ledger from spam or malicious usage.
 
When you are sending XRP to an exchange, destination tag is very important.
Destination tag is not needed when you transfer XRP to your own wallet address.
 
● XUMM by XRPL Labs | Developers
XUMM is a free app (iOS and Android) that makes sending, receiving and interacting with the XRP ledger easy & secure.
 
● Ledger Nano S | Tutorial | FAQ | Buy Online | Ripple Recovery Tool
Cryptocurrency Hardware Wallet
When you get your Ledger wallet, you must reset it and get a new set of 24 words seed before using it.
 
● The World Exchange | How to Create a Cold Wallet for Ripple
A free user-friendly and purely client-side wallet
 
● GateHub | Support | Network Statistics
GateHub XRP Web Wallet
 
Tools
Check XRP wallet balance - Bithomp | Graph | Transactions
Print raw information about an account, a transaction or a ledger - RPC Tool
 
Exchanges
The best way to support XRP is to buy/sell XRP directly with your local currency, not with USDT, ETH, LTC, or BTC.
Available XRP pairs - AUD, BRL, CAD, CNY, EUR, GBP, IDR, INR, JPY, KRW, MXN, PHP, RUB, THB, TRY, UAH, USD, ZAR.
You can find the complete list of XRP exchanges and supported XRP/fiat pairs Here.
 
USD - US Dollar
Kraken | Bitstamp | Bitfinex | CEX.IO | Gatehub |
Exrates | Exmo | Mr. Exchange | Bitsane | Sistemkoin | BitBay | Quoine
 
EUR - Euro
Kraken | Bitstamp | Gatehub | CEX.IO | LiteBit.eu | Anycoin Direct
The Rock Trading | Bitsane | BitBay | BitFlip | Bitlish | Quoine
 
KRW - South Korean Won
Bithumb | Upbit | Coinone | Korbit | GOPAX | Coinrail
 
JPY - Japanese Yen
Kraken | Bitbank | Quoine | Mr. Exchange
 
CNY - Chinese Yuan
RippleFox | Ripple China | Fatbtc
 
TRY - Turkish Lira
Vebitcoin | BTCTurk | Koineks | Sistemkoin | Ovis
 
INR - Indian Rupee
Zebpay | Koinex | Unocoin | Bitbns | BuyBitcoin | BuyUcoin
 
AUD - Australian Dollar
BTC Markets
 
THB - Thai Baht
BX Thailand
 
MXN - Mexican Peso
Bitso
 
IDR - Indonesian Rupiah
Indodax | Quoine
 
RUB - Russian Ruble
Exmo | BitFlip
 
ZAR - South African Rend
Altcoin Trader
 
CAD - Canadian Dollar
Kraken
 
UAH - Ukrainian Hryvnia
Kuna | BTC Trade UA | BitFlip
 
GBP - British Pound
Cryptomate
 
BRL - Brazilian Real
Braziliex
 
SGD - Singapore Dollar
Quoine
 
AED - United Arab Emirates Dirham
BitOasis
 
PHP - Philippine peso
CX | Exchange
 
USDT - Tether
Poloniex | Bittrex | Huobi | OKEx | CoinBene | Upbit | HitBTC |
ZB.com | Gate.io | Sistemkoin
 
ETH - Ethereum
Binance | Bittrex | Gatehub | OKEx | OTCBTC | Upbit | HitBTC |
Bitsane | Mr. Exchange | CoinFalcon
 
LTC - Litecoin
Bitsane | Mr. Exchange
 
BTC - Bitcoin
Kraken | Bitstamp | Bitfinex | CEX.IO | Gatehub | Binance | Poloniex | Bittrex |
HitBTC | OKEx | Upbit | Huobi | BTCTurk | BTC Markets | CoinEgg | Exmo |
ZB.com | OTCBTC | Coinrail | Bits Blockchain | Triple Dice Exchange | Indodax |
Exrates | Qryptos | Gate.io | Bitsane | Bitso | Ovis | BCEX | BitBay |
Mr. Exchange | Orionx | CoinFalcon | Abucoins | BitFlip | LakeBTC | Coinbe
submitted by nvok to Ripple [link] [comments]

The Exhaustive EOS FAQ

The Exhaustive EOS FAQ

 
With the large number of new readers coming to this sub we need to make information easy to access so those readers can make informed decisions. We all know there is an unusually large amount of Fear, Uncertainty and Doubt (FUD) surrounding EOS. Frankly, when clear evidence is provided it’s not that difficult to see EOS for the extremely valuable project it is. This post hopes to begin to put an end to all the misinformation by doing the following:  
  • Giving a clear and concise answer to the most frequently asked questions in regards to EOS.
  • Giving a more in-depth answer for those who want to read more.
  • Allowing readers to make informed decisions by making credible information easy to access.
 
As EOS climbs the ranks we need to recognise there are going to be a lot of skeptical readers coming over and posting their questions. Sometimes they will be irrational, hostile and often just looking for a reaction. We should make it our responsibility to welcome everyone and refrain from responding emotionally to provocative posts, instead providing factual and rational answers.
I will add to this post as and when I can, if you have any ideas or spot any mistakes let me know and I'll get them fixed ASAP. Im planning to add a bit on the team, centralisation and DPOS, governance and EOS VC shortly but please let me hear your suggestions!
 

FAQ

1. How do you registeclaim your EOS tokens before June 2018?

 
Answer courtesy of endless. If you have not done so, you will need to create a new pair of EOS public and private keys and register them with an Ethereum address. This only needs to be done once.
On or around June 1, 2018 all EOS Tokens will become frozen and non-transferable on the Ethereum blockchain. Not long after, I suspect that EOS community members will create a snapshot of token balances that carry over onto a new community generated and selected EOS blockchain. block.one will not be launching EOS blockchains or operating any of their nodes. Additionally, this is a community subreddit unaffiliated in an official capacity with block.one
Method #1: MetaMask (recommended)
Video guide: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8K1Q5hX_4-o
steemit tutorial: https://steemit.com/eos/@ash/full-walkthrough-how-to-join-eos-ico
Method #2: MyEtherWallet
steemit tutorial: https://steemit.com/eos/@sandwich/contributing-to-eos-token-sale-with-myetherwallet-and-contract-inner-workings
Method #3: Exodus Wallet
Official website tutorial: http://support.exodus.io/article/65-i-ve-received-eos-tokens-in-exodus-how-do-i-register-them
Important note courtesy of dskvry bka Sandwich, the author of Method #2's steemit tutorial:
claimAll will not work for most users. When you get to the claim step, please use the following tutorial: https://steemit.com/eos/@koyn/minimizing-the-cost-of-gas-when-claiming-eos-using-myetherwallet
Did you buy your EOS tokens on an exchange? (Courtesy of IQOptionCoin)
REMEMBER YOU ONLY NEED TO REGISTER YOUR TOKENS IF YOU BOUGHT THEM ON AN EXCHANGE. YOU DON'T NEED TO CLAIM THEM.
  1. Go to the EOS website https://eos.io
  2. Scroll down and select "GET EOS"
  3. Tick all the required boxes and click "Continue"
  4. Scroll down and click "Register"
  5. Select Metamask, MyEtherWallet, or Ethereum Wallet
  6. Follow the guide.
  7. Remember that the reason you need to register your Ethereum ERC-20 address is to include your EOS tokens in order for the balance of your EOS Tokens to be included in the Snapshot if a Snapshot is created, you must register your Ethereum address with an EOS public key. The EOS snapshot will take place prior to the 1 June 2018. After this point your ERC-20 EOS tokens will be frozen. And you will be issued EOS tokens on the EOS blockchain.
So PLEASE REGISTER your Ethereum address NOW, don't forget about it, or plan on doing it some time in the near future.
There are a lot of submissions about this in /eos, so rather than making a new one please reply to this thread with any questions you may have. Don't forget to join the EOS mailing list: https://eos.io/#subscribe and join the EOS community on your platform(s) of choice: Telegram, Discord and/or Facebook.
And remember, if anyone instructs you to transfer ETH to an EOS contract address that doesn't match the address found on https://eos.io you are being scammed.
 

Sources:

How to registeclaim your EOS tokens before June 2018 by endless
Official EOS FAQ
 

2. How will the token the ERC-20 EOS tokens be transferred to the native blockchain?

 

Quick answer:

There isn't one! Read the long answer then read it again, registering your Ethereum wallet is mandatory!
 

Long answer:

Within 23 hours after the end of the final period on June 1, 2018 at 22:59:59 UTC, all EOS Tokens will become fixed (ie. frozen) and will become non-transferrable on the Ethereum blockchain.
In order to ensure your tokens are transferred over to the native blockchain you must register your Ethereum address with an EOS public key, if you do not you will lose all your tokens! I am not going to link any tutorials as there are many that can be found by searching Google and YouTube.
block.one is helping with the development of snapshot software that can be used to capture the EOS token balance and registered EOS public key of wallets on the Ethereum blockchain. It is then down to the community to create the snapshot. This snapshot can be used when generating a genesis block for a blockchain implementing eos.io software. block.one will not be launching EOS blockchains or operating any of their nodes.
 
Exchange Support
Some exchanges have announced that they will support the token swap. Although using this method will undoubtedly be much simpler than registering the tokens yourself it also comes with its pitfalls.
  • It is highly likely there are going to be multiple networks running on the eos.io software that use the snapshot. It is highly unlikely that exchanges will support them all.
  • It is highly likely that exchanges will not support airdrops that use the snapshot.
Exchanges that have announced support for the token swap include:
 

Sources:

EOS.io
 

3. What does EOS aim to achieve?

 

Quick answer:

EOS.IO software is aiming to provide a decentralized operating system which can support thousands of industrial scale DApps by enabling vertical and horizontal scaling.
 

Long answer:

EOS.IO is software that introduces a blockchain architecture designed to enable vertical and horizontal scaling of decentralized applications. This is achieved through an operating system-like construct upon which applications can be built. The software provides accounts, authentication, databases, asynchronous communication and the scheduling of applications across multiple CPU cores and/or clusters. The resulting technology is a blockchain architecture that has the potential to scale to millions of transactions per second, eliminates user fees and allows for quick and easy deployment of decentralized applications.
 

Sources:

Official EOS FAQ
 

4. Who are the key team figures behind EOS?

 
  • CEO Brendan Blumer - Founder of ii5 (1group) and okay.com. He has been in the blockchain industry since 2014 and started selling virtual assets at the age of 15. Brenden can be found on the Forbes Cypto Rich List. Brendan can be found on Twitter.
  • CTO Dan Larimer - Dan's the visionary industry leader who built BitShares, Graphene and Steemit as well as the increasingly popular Proof of Stake Governance and Decentralised Autonomous Organization Concept. He states his mission in life is “to find free market solutions to secure life, liberty, and property for all.”. Dan can also be found on the Forbes Cypto Rich List. Dan can be found on Twitter and Medium.
  • Partner Ian Grigg - Financial cryptographer who's been building cryptographic ledger platforms for 2+ decades. Inventor of the Ricardian Contract and Triple-Entry Accounting.
 

Sources:

Forbes Crypto Rich List
 

5. Where can the latest EOS news be found?

 
Official:
Community:
Developers:
 

6. Which consensus mechanism does EOS use and what are Block Producers?

 

Quick answer:

Delegated Proof of Stake (DPOS) with Byzantine Fault Tolerance. Block Producers (BPs) produce the blocks of the blockchain and are elected by token holders that vote for them. BPs will earn block rewards for their service, these block rewards come in the form of EOS tokens produced by token inflation.
 

Long answer:

Taken from the EOS.IO Technical White Paper v2:
“EOS.IO software utilizes the only known decentralized consensus algorithm proven capable of meeting the performance requirements of applications on the blockchain, Delegated Proof of Stake (DPOS). Under this algorithm, those who hold tokens on a blockchain adopting the EOS.IO software may select block producers through a continuous approval voting system. Anyone may choose to participate in block production and will be given an opportunity to produce blocks, provided they can persuade token holders to vote for them.
The EOS.IO software enables blocks to be produced exactly every 0.5 second and exactly one producer is authorized to produce a block at any given point in time. If the block is not produced at the scheduled time, then the block for that time slot is skipped. When one or more blocks are skipped, there is a 0.5 or more second gap in the blockchain.
Using the EOS.IO software, blocks are produced in rounds of 126 (6 blocks each, times 21 producers). At the start of each round 21 unique block producers are chosen by preference of votes cast by token holders. The selected producers are scheduled in an order agreed upon by 15 or more producers.
Byzantine Fault Tolerance is added to traditional DPOS by allowing all producers to sign all blocks so long as no producer signs two blocks with the same timestamp or the same block height. Once 15 producers have signed a block the block is deemed irreversible. Any byzantine producer would have to generate cryptographic evidence of their treason by signing two blocks with the same timestamp or blockheight. Under this model a irreversible consensus should be reachable within 1 second."
 

7. How does the voting process work?

 
The voting process will begin once the Block Producer community releases a joint statement ensuring that it is safe to import private keys and vote.
Broadly speaking there will be two methods of voting:
  1. Command Line Interface (CLI) tools
  2. Web portals
EOS Canada has created eosc, a CLI tool that supports Block Producer voting. Other Block Producer candidates such as LibertyBlock are a releasing web portal that will be ready for main net launch. There will be many more options over the coming weeks, please make sure you are always using a service from a trusted entity.
Remember: Do not import your private key until you have seen a joint statement released from at least five Block Producers that you trust which states when it is safe to do so. Ignoring this warning could result in tokens lost.
 

8. What makes EOS a good investment?

 
  • Team - EOS is spearheaded by the visionary that brought us the hugely successful Bitshares and Steem - arguably with two projects already under his belt there is no one more accomplished in the space.
  • Funding - EOS is one of the best funded projects in the space. The block.one team has committed $1B to investing in funds that grow the EOS echo system. EOS VC funds are managed by venture leaders distributed around the world to insure founders in all markets have the ability to work directly with local investors. Incentives such as the EOS hackathon are also in place with $1,500,000 USD in Prizes Across 4 Events.
  • Community Focus - The team is aware that the a projects success depends almost entirely on its adoption. For this reason there has been a huge push to develop a strong world wide community. There is already a surplus number of block producers that have registered their interest and started to ready themselves for the launch and incentives the EOS hackathon are being used to grow the community. A index of projects using EOS can be found at https://eosindex.io/posts.
  • Technical Advantages - See point 9!
 

9. What are the unique selling points of EOS?

 
  • Scaleability
    • Potential to scale to millions of transactions per second
    • Inter-blockchain communication
    • Separates authentication from execution
  • Flexibility
    • Freeze and fix broken applications
    • Generalised role based permissions
    • Web Assembly
  • Usability
    • Elimination of transaction fees
    • True user accounts with usernames, passwords and account recovery (no more having to remember long cryptographic keys)
    • Web toolkit for interface development
 

Sources:

eos.io
EOS Whitepaper
 

10. Is there currently a working product?

 

Quick answer:

This depends entirely on your definition of working product. If a fully featured developer release meets your definition then yes!. Otherwise the public release will be June 2018.
 

Long answer:

EOS differs from other projects in that it aims to deliver a fully featured version of the software on launch. The Dawn 3.0 RC1 feature complete pre-release became available on April 5th. This version has all the features of the final release that is due June 2018. Further development will involve preparing the final system contract which implements all of the staking, voting, and governance mechanics. The common notion that there is no viewable code published is wrong and the initial Dawn 1.0 release has been available from September 14th 2017.
 
EOSIO V1 - June 2nd 2018
Dawn 3.0 RC1 - April 5th 2018
Dawn 3.0 Alpha - January 23rd 2018
Dawn 2.0 - December 4th 2017
Dawn 1.0 - September 14th 2017
 

Sources:

 

11. EOS is an ERC-20 token, how can it possibly be a competitor to other platforms?

 

Quick answer:

The ERC-20 token is used only for raising funds during the token distribution; all tokens will be transferred to the native blockchain once launched.
 

Long answer:

EOS team has clearly stated their reason for choosing the Ethereum network when they described the rationale behind the ICO model. Specifically, the ICO should be a fair and auditable process, with as little trust required as possible. If you believe that an ICO should be fair, auditable, and trustless, you have no choice but to use a decentralized smart contract blockchain to run the ICO, the largest, and by-far most popular of which is Ethereum. Since EOS is intended to be a major competitor for Ethereum, some have seen this as a hypocritical choice. - Stolen from trogdor on Steam (I couldn’t word it any better myself).  

Sources:

The EOS ico for dummies by trogdor
Official EOS FAQ
 

12. Why do the eos.io T&C’s say the ERC-20 token has no value?

 
The EOS T&C’s famously state:
"The EOS Tokens do not have any rights, uses, purpose, attributes, functionalities or features, express or implied, including, without limitation, any uses, purpose, attributes, functionalities or features on the EOS Platform."
 

Quick answer:

This is legal wording to avoid all the legal complications in this emerging space, block.one do not want to find themselves in a lawsuit as we are seeing with an increasing amount of other ICOs. Most notably Tezos (links below).
 

Long answer:

This all comes down to legal issues. Anyone who’s been into crypto for 5 minuets knows that government bodies such as the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) are now paying attention to crypto in a big way. This legal wording is to avoid all the legal complications in this emerging space, block.one do not want to find themselves in a lawsuit as we are seeing with an increasing amount of other ICOs. Many token creators that launched ICOs are now in deep water for selling unregistered securities.
 
A filing from the Tezos lawsuit:
"In sum, Defendants capitalized on the recent enthusiasm for blockchain technology and cryptocurrencies to raise funds through the ICO, illegally sold unqualified and unregistered securities, used a Swiss-based entity in an unsuccessful attempt to evade U.S. securities laws, and are now admittedly engaged in the conversion, selling, and possible dissipation of the proceeds that they collected from the Class through their unregistered offering."
 
To ensure EOS tokens are not classed as a unregistered security block.one has made it clear that they are creating the EOS software only and won’t launching a public blockchain themselves. This task is left down to the community, or more precisely, the Block Producers (BPs). The following disclaimer is seen after posts from block.one:
 
"block.one is a software company and is producing the EOS.IO software as free, open source software. This software may enable those who deploy it to launch a blockchain or decentralized applications with the features described above. block.one will not be launching a public blockchain based on the EOS.IO software. It will be the sole responsibility of third parties and the community and those who wish to become block producers to implement the features and/or provide the services described above as they see fit. block.one does not guarantee that anyone will implement such features or provide such services or that the EOS.IO software will be adopted and deployed in any way.”
 
It is expected that many blockchains using eos.io software will emerge. To ensure DAPPs are created on an ecosystem that aligns with the interests of block.one a $1bn fund will be has been created to incentivise projects to use this blockchain.
 

Sources:

EOS.io FAQ Great video on this topic by The Awakenment EOS $1bn Fund Announcement Article on the Tezos lawsuit Article on the Gigawatt lawsuit An official block.one post featuring disclaimer
 

13. Why is the token distribution one year long?

 
Official statement from block.one:
“A lot of token distributions only allow a small amount of people to participate. The EOS Token distribution structure was created to provide a sufficient period of time for people to participate if they so choose, as well as give people the opportunity to see the development of the EOS.IO Software prior to making a decision to purchase EOS Tokens.”
 
It is also worth noting that block.one had no knowledge how much the the token distribution would raise as it is determined by the free market and the length of the token distribution is coded into the Ethereum smart contract, which cannot be changed.
 

Sources:

EOS.io FAQ
 

14. Where is the money going from the token distribution?

 

Quick answer:

Funding for the project was raised before EOS was announced, the additional money raised from the token distribution is largely going to fund projects on EOS.
 

Long answer:

A large portion of the money raised is getting put back into the community to incentivise projects using eos.io software. block.one raised all the money they needed to develop the software before the ERC-20 tokens went on sale. There are some conspiracies that block.one are pumping the price of EOS using the funds raised. The good thing about blockchain is you can trace all the transactions, which show nothing of the sort. Not only this but the EOS team are going to have an independent audit after the funding is complete for piece of mind.
 
From eos.io FAQ:
“block.one intends to engage an independent third party auditor who will release an independent audit report providing further assurances that block.one has not purchased EOS Tokens during the EOS Token distribution period or traded EOS Tokens (including using proceeds from the EOS Token distribution for these purposes). This report will be made available to the public on the eos.io website.”
 

Sources:

EOS.io FAQ EOS $1bn Fund Announcement
 

15. Who's using EOS?

 
With 2 months from launch left there is a vibrant community forming around EOS. Some of the most notable projects that EOS software will support are:
A more complete list of EOS projects can be found at eosindex.io.
 

16. Dan left his previous projects, will he leave EOS?

 

Quick answer:

When EOS has been created Dan will move onto creating projects for EOS with block.one.
 

Long answer:

When a blockchain project has gained momentum and a strong community has formed the project takes on a life of its own and the communities often have ideas that differ from the creators. As we have seen with the Bitcoin and Ethereum hark forks you cant pivot a community too much in a different direction, especially if its changing the fundamentals of the blockchain. Instead of acting like a tyrant Dan has let the communities do what they want and gone a different way. Both the Bitshares and Steem were left in a great position and with Dans help turned out to be two of the most successful blockchain projects to date. Some would argue the most successful projects that are actually useable and have a real use case.
What Dan does best is build the architecture and show whats possible. Anyone can then go on to do the upgrades. He is creating EOS to build his future projects upon it. He has stated he loves working at block.one with Brendan and the team and there is far too much momentum behind EOS for him to possibly leave.
 

Sources:

Dans future beyond EOS
Why Dan left Bitshares
Why Dan left Steem
 

17. Is EOS susceptible to DDoS attacks?

 
No one could have better knowledge on this subject than our Block Producer candidates, I have chosen to look to EOS New York for this answer:
"DDoS'ing a block producing is not as simple as knowing their IP address and hitting "go". We have distributed systems engineers in each of our candidate groups that have worked to defend DDoS systems in their careers. Infrastructure can be built in a way to minimize the exposure of the Block Producing node itself and to prevent a DDoS attack. We haven't published our full architecture yet but let's take a look at fellow candidate EOSphere to see what we mean. As for the launch of the network, we are assuming there will be attacks on the network as we launch. It is being built into the network launch plans. I will reach out to our engineers to get a more detailed answer for you. What also must be considered is that there will be 121 total producing and non-producing nodes on the network. To DDoS all 121 which are located all around the world with different security configurations at the exact same time would be a monumental achievement."
 

Sources:

eosnewyork on DDoS attackd
EOSSphere Architecture
 

18. If block producers can alter code how do we know they will not do so maliciously?

 

Quick answer:

  • Block producers are voted in by stake holders.
  • Changes to the protocol, constitution or other updates are proposed to the community by block producers.
  • Changes takes 2 to 3 months due to the fact block producers must maintain 15/21 approval for a set amount of time while for changes to be processed.
  • To ensure bad actors can be identified and expelled the block.one backed community will not back an open-entry system built around anonymous participation.
 

Long answer:

For this question we must understand the following.
  • Governance and why it is used.
  • The process of upgrading the protocol, constitution & other updates.
  • Dan’s view on open-entry systems built around anonymous participation.
 
Governance
Cryptography can only be used to prove logical consistency. It cannot be used to make subjective judgment calls, determine right or wrong, or even identify truth or falsehood (outside of consistency). We need humans to perform these tasks and therefore we need governance!
Governance is the process by which people in a community:
  1. Reach consensus on subjective matters of collective action that cannot be captured entirely by software algorithms;
  2. Carry out the decisions they reach; and
  3. Alter the governance rules themselves via Constitutional amendments.
Embedded into the EOS.IO software is the election of block producers. Before any change can be made to the blockchain these block producers must approve it. If the block producers refuse to make changes desired by the token holders then they can be voted out. If the block producers make changes without permission of the token holders then all other non-producing full-node validators (exchanges, etc) will reject the change.
 
Upgrade process
The EOS.IO software defines the following process by which the protocol, as defined by the canonical source code and its constitution, can be updated:
  1. Block producers propose a change to the constitution and obtains 15/21 approval.
  2. Block producers maintain 15/21 approval of the new constitution for 30 consecutive days.
  3. All users are required to indicate acceptance of the new constitution as a condition of future transactions being processed.
  4. Block producers adopt changes to the source code to reflect the change in the constitution and propose it to the blockchain using the hash of the new constitution.
  5. Block producers maintain 15/21 approval of the new code for 30 consecutive days.
  6. Changes to the code take effect 7 days later, giving all non-producing full nodes 1 week to upgrade after ratification of the source code.
  7. All nodes that do not upgrade to the new code shut down automatically.
By default, configuration of the EOS.IO software, the process of updating the blockchain to add new features takes 2 to 3 months, while updates to fix non-critical bugs that do not require changes to the constitution can take 1 to 2 months.
 
Open-entry systems built around anonymous participation
To ensure bad actors can be identified and expelled the block.one backed community will not back an open-entry system built around anonymous participation.
Dan's quote:
"The only way to maintain the integrity of a community is for the community to have control over its own composition. This means that open-entry systems built around anonymous participation will have no means expelling bad actors and will eventually succumb to profit-driven corruption. You cannot use stake as a proxy for goodness whether that stake is held in a bond or a shareholder’s vote. Goodness is subjective and it is up to each community to define what values they hold as good and to actively expel people they hold has bad.
The community I want to participate in will expel the rent-seeking vote-buyers and reward those who use their elected broadcasting power for the benefit of all community members rather than special interest groups (such as vote-buyers). I have faith that such a community will be far more competitive in a market competition for mindshare than one that elects vote buyers."
 

Sources:

The Limits of Crypto-economic Governance
EOS.IO Technical White Paper v2
 

19. What is the most secure way to generate EOS key pairs?

 
Block producer candidates EOS Cafe and EOS New York have come forward to help the community with this topic.
The block producer candidate eosnewyork has kindly posted a tutorial on steemit detailing the steps that need to be taken to generate key pairs using the official code on the EOS.IO Github.
The block producer candidate eoscafe has gone a step further and released an Offline EOS Key Generator application complete with GUI for Windows, Linux & Mac. Not only can this application generate key pairs but it can also validate key pairs and resolve public keys from private keys. This application has also been vouched for by EOS New York
 

Sources:

EOS.IO Github
eosnewyork's key pair generation tutorial
eoscafe's offline key par generation application  
submitted by Techno-Tech to eos [link] [comments]

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